beaches

Jo’s Monday walk : Monte Clerigo

If you saw my last post you’ll know that I spent the previous weekend in Aljezur. Wild, west coast beauty, and quite unlike my own gentle Algarve shoreline. An untamed ocean pounding the cliffs. It can take your breath away- literally, sometimes, as the force of the wind hits you. I could never persuade my husband to live here. For him, warmth trumps beauty. But if I can spend time on these cliffs and beaches I’m in a world of my own. Come with me to the windswept beach of Monte Clerigo….

The weekend hadn’t gone entirely to plan, but then, mine seldom do. Part of life’s rich tapestry, you might say. Because we had just one night available I had selected a hotel close to the beaches, and offering breakfast. The night before departure an email advised me that, thanks to Covid-19, breakfasts were not available in May. A quick look at the map assured me that we would find somewhere to eat not too far away, so off we went! In Tavira the temperatures were hovering around 27C. Not so on the refreshing west coast! Pulling my cotton shirt tight around me, I rounded the corner of the hotel to observe the pretty swimming pool. Waves were rolling across the water, in the icy blast! No idling by the pool with that book, for sure. Supper at the local Mexican restaurant was to have been a spicy compensation. The heat of the jalapenos almost lifted me from my seat, but the burrito, sadly, was cold. Outside people huddled in padded jackets, trying to escape the howling wind. And the last straw? The only dessert available was a chocolate banoffee, and I can’t abide mushy banana. Are you feeling sorry for me yet?

We checked out of the hotel early next morning, under a clear blue sky. The small beachside village of Monte Clerigo was a 5 minute drive, and the day began to look up. The wind still battered us, but I gaped in delight at the expanse of beach that went on, and on… Even I wasn’t foolhardy enough to sit on the outside deck of the beachfront restaurant, but my eyes stayed riveted to the view.

Before too long I was dancing along that beach! Well, more truthfully, heading for shelter, bent double, beneath the cliffs. But with the wind behind me, striding back was a joy. Look at that village, nestled into the hillside! The next task, to climb high above it, to the cliff top.

Steep, uneven steps lead up from the beach, around the back of the pretty village houses, and join with a gravel track. Cars and campervans can drive this stretch and there is even limited off road parking, but after a few minutes you reach the cliff path.

The views sweep away, up and down the coast, breathtaking in their beauty. For a moment you forget the breeze, and then it sucks at your clothing and you fight for balance. Far below, the waves crash. The path is sandy, making your legs feel heavy, sinking unsteadily.

The path twists and turns along the cliff, with every now and then a blue and green striped marker, just to ensure you are still on course. Pockets of tiny blue flowers gaze heavenwards, and a mass of yellow something huddles together, hunkered down against the wind. The fleshy roots of Livingstone daisies beam scarlet against the sand.

The rugged bays stretch ahead and behind, and in places there are strips of boardwalk. Erosion is a constant problem on these cliffs. An old watchtower or abandoned dwelling crumbles silently towards the shore.

We had intended to walk as far as Arrifana Beach, but the buffeting winds and our weary legs brought us to a halt a little short of there, for we still had the return journey to make. Every bit as enticing, the low growing shrubs rolling ahead of us.

But still, I was happy to see the end of the trail, and to collapse into the car, warm from our exertions. Homeward bound, we did stop off at Arrifana, just for a swift peak. A surfer’s bay, it was busy, and the hand rails lined with boards and wet suits. A Sunday lunch spot.

I’d like to dedicate this post to my lovely friend, Marie. She was no walker, but she loved the sight and the sound of the sea. I have to smile, or rather wince, at the memory of one stroll we took together, to catch a breath of sea air. I clumsily jammed a finger in her car door, and the stroll became a sit on the boardwalk, head between my knees. A permanent reminder of Marie, as if I needed one. We spent hours together, watching Rafa pull off yet another French Open, and during lockdown a Saturday night Chinese takeaway at hers was a rare treat. She was a kind and gentle soul, with a strong core. Which she needed for these last weeks have been harrowing. Yesterday evening the call came. Suffering is no more, but a very lovely lady is no longer here to share the laughter and tears.

Marie Teresa Brannan – 3.8.54 – 30.5.21 R.I.P. You will be sorely missed. My love and thoughts are with your family.

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This was a hard post to finish, but thank you all for sharing it with me. As previously announced, I will be taking a break from blogging. It’s long overdue, and the hot summer days will often find me beside a beach. One last share before I go.

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Come and have a look around Melbourne, with Teresa :

Going Around the City

Munsiyari- what does that mean to you? For me it’s a very beautiful place :

A Morning’s walk

And there’s no doubt that Rupali knows beauty when she sees it :

A walk in the garden: chasing colours – blue and green

Woodland, canal, a chirpy robin… Drake has it all, but those cows are watching you!

If not, so be happy

If it’s adventure you’re wanting, Sarah’s your girl!

A walk on Sausage Island: It’s all about the Elephants

As Mel points out, many Australian place names are unappealing, but never let that stop you walking with her :

Dawdling, Daydreaming and Dillydallying at The Drip, Mudgee

A simple walk, in lovely company! Join Manja and Bestia :

New trail

Marsha has been a source of inspiration, and not a little fun, since the day I met her!

#WQWWC #26: Hope we can make it up Thumb Butte Trail

And Rosemay has been a constant friend. Join her in this adventure :

Exploring Denali National Park – Part 1 (Looking out for Bears, Wolves and Lynxes)

Last, but not least, Carol brings you sensational views :

San Francisco Views

Take care of each other, and get out walking when you can. This morning I will be walking with friends, who all knew Marie. Part of the walk will be on the beach, and afterwards we’ll lunch at a restaurant she loved, and raise a glass. As her son said to me last night, ‘remember the good times’.

Just one more person from around the world!

It’s a very common sight on Algarve beaches, as the tide turns, for people to gather on the beach, digging a heel into the wet sand in a sort of shuffle dance. A lot of scuffling often produces enough molluscs to fill a plastic bottle for a lunch time snack, but there are guys for whom this is a serious business. They stand in the water, often waist deep, in whatever the weather gods throw at them. Treading backwards, they drag the net, hour on hour, for an often paltry reward of shellfish. I’m told it pays well, but I can think of easier ways to make a living. That certainly applies to Cady’s Just One Person from Around the World this week. She tells of an awesome level of commitment.

Bright and breezy

“Always look on the bright side of life…” Not always so easy to do, but I find it easier when our beaches are open. Happy and sandboy come to mind. Wishing you an Easter filled with hope and optimism. Oh, yes- and chocolate!

Becky’s playing with squares again. She’d love you to join her. The theme is BrightSquare.

Beach walk reflections

You never can keep a good blogger down. I expect many of you remember Frank, from A Frank Angle. I came to know him as the life of his blog was coming to its close and we discovered a shared love of walking and beaches. Where we differ is that Frank likes to ponder the mysteries of life on his wanderings. I just skim the surface. So, if you feel like a good ponder I’m sure you’ll be interested in Frank’s new blog, Beach Walk Reflections. Here’s a little taste of what you can expect.

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I like walking on the beach. It is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Ever think about seeds? They seem so simple at a glance – even on closer examination. We typically think of a hard, thin outer shell with a softer inside. 

On the other hand, this seemingly plain object is the beginning of something new – something beautiful – something useful – a green plant that can be as simple as grass or are grand as a large tree.

Earth’s annual regeneration of seeds for release (many in the fall) – possibly covered by winter snows – yet ready for renewal in the spring so the cycle can repeat – all this with its goal of perpetuating the species.

I think of the farmer preparing the land before planting the seeds. Whether scattering the seeds randomly or planting them in straight rows with distinct spacing, time delivers something that belongs to all of us – bountiful crops and flowers. 

As I walk, trees are sparse – only found on the grounds of some condominiums – although they are naturally found a short distance away from this beach. I think about a forest. Somewhere in that forest’s history, there was a time of one tree – the first tree. One tree that came from a seed. From that one tree came other trees – each coming from a seed.

I think about the sizes and shapes of seeds – from the tiniest orchid seed to a type of coconut containing the largest seed – shapes as squares, oblong, angular, triangles, round, egg-shaped, bean-shaped, kidney-shaped, discs, and spheres. Some seeds with lines and ridges – others perfectly smooth – plus in a variety of colors, and some even speckled.  

A seed has three components – an outer protective coat, the embryo for growing into a new plant, and the food source giving the embryo and young plant its initial food source for growth – all aspects for increasing a chance for survival.

Ever notice how leaves sprout early from a seed? Yes, leaves for producing food for the youthful, growing plant because the initial food source is small. 

Seeds hold the potential to produce something new because they contain hope and promise for something new. But not all plants use seeds for reproduction. For instance, mosses or ferns do not  – but seed plants are the ones that dominate the plant world. 

This causes me to think about our fertility – that is, the seeds within us. The promises that we hold that can produce a bountiful yield.

Interesting that the sperm of human males are called seeds, but in the plant world, seeds are something produced after the sperm fertilizes the egg.

Seeds are mobile, so they must have adaptations to move them around – a method of dispersal. Some have wings to be carried by the wind. Some have barbs, burrs, or hooks to attach to fur, feathers, or even human clothing to be dropped elsewhere. Some are buoyant so moving water can transport them. Others are surrounded by fleshy fruit that will be eaten, therefore the seeds can be exposed and deposited elsewhere for potential growth. 

I remember the large oak trees at my previous home. Each producing a bountiful supply of acorns – but not the same number each year. Each acorn with a coat, an embryo, and food supply. Each acorn is the potential for a new oak tree. However, all those acorns from one tree – a culinary feast for squirrels preparing for winter – so I wonder how many of all those acorns will yield their acorns in time. 

Seeds are that structure we plant in fertile soil and associate with terms as vigor, viability, dormancy, and germination. Seeds are also a source for food, oils, cooking ingredients, flavorings, jewelry, and even deadly poisons.

Besides a simple design yielding a complex adult, the seed is also a useful metaphor.

People are hidden seeds waiting to become viable vessels of knowledge. Because every seed has the potential for a significant result, seeds are a symbol for the potential that is in each of us for a positive future – a power of hope and possibility. Teachers hope to plant a seed in students – a seed that develops over time into something valued by others and society – their role in cultivating humanity.

Seeds are the ideas coming to us from thinking. The something that initiated a thought process that leads to personal action for improving life. The seeds of discovery lie in the knowledge of determination through the human spirit.

I think about how each of us has a bright side and a dark side – the good seeds and the bad seeds. Seeds are a symbol for laying the groundwork for future development as planting the seed – but some use planting the seed for promoting negative feelings or a downfall.

Religions rely on the seeds of faith while politics prefers manipulating the seeds for selfishness.  

A heart contains seeds of love that are waiting to sprout a new life with that special someone.

I think about how entrepreneurs use “seed money” for starting a new business. I also remember during my youth using “bird feed” or “chicken feed” as a term for a small amount of anything – something paltry or minuscule in amount.

Seeds – that simple, interesting, incredible, and successful biological design found in nature that plays a large role in human life. I don’t recall what triggered thinking about seeds on this day, but it has been an interesting mental journey and exercise as I walk. After all, I like walking on the beach because it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Join Frank on Tuesday, 20th October to enjoy some Beach Walk Reflections

Six word Saturday

Being here makes my heart happy

I’m sure you can see why.  Access to the beaches in Portugal has been restored, with a few restrictions.  Happiness beckons!  Enjoy your Saturday, and don’t forget to share Six Words with Debbie.

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Jo’s Monday walk : Fabrica to Cacela Velha

Fabrica, our start point

Fabrica, our start point

If there’s one place in the Algarve that always works its magic on me, it’s Cacela Velha.  I’ve taken you there before on my walks (remember Mind that hole!?) but today we’re taking the boat ride from Fabrica.  In all my Algarve years I’d yet to see the ferry across to the beach operating, but a reference to it in Spanish ‘Conde Nast’ left me determined.  Described as ‘one of the best 15 beaches in the world’, I’ll leave you to judge for yourself.  How many beaches can there be in such a location?

But I’m getting ahead of myself, as usual.  Taking a Cacela Velha turn off from the E125, you will first come to a sign pointing to Fabrica.   This will bring you to a tiny harbour with a couple of very laidback bars and a restaurant.  Out of season it’s a place for fishermen and locals, but on the last day of my holiday in September it was almost bustling.  The tide was out and flipflops or bare feet were the best way to squidge across to the boat.

Leaving the harbour

Leaving the harbour

We scoot out to meet the sea, the boatman deftly following preordained paths through the water.  Running aground would be all too easy.

You have two choices for disembarking- the first stop is opposite to Fabrica.  The second, further along the sand bar, is opposite Cacela Velha. Let’s get out at the first, then we can have a bit of a beach comb before catching the boat back from the second stop.

Looking back at the shoreline

Looking back at the shoreline

And just in case you thought I had the beach to myself...

And just in case you thought I had the beach to myself…

It's a great meeting place for birds

The lagoon is a great meeting place for birds

There's the boatman heading back to base

There’s the boatman heading back to base

Ahead, the open sea

Ahead, the open sea

The sky was very hazy and the sea a milky blue as I wandered with my camera.  What makes this beach special, though, is the view back across the lagoon to the fortress on the headland.  There’s an almost mystical quality, to my mind, in being out there on the lagoon.  The tide was low enough to plodge across to the shore, but the sea creeps in stealthily here and you can be caught out.

The fortress across the bay

The fortress across the bay

A handful of people in the water

A handful of people in the water

The fortress reflected in the salty puddles

The fortress reflected in salty puddles

I carry on beach combing as the tide flows gently back.  Joyful cries and laughter reach me from the family on the sandbar.  The Portuguese families revel in their beautiful surroundings.  And I do, too.

Can you see them on the sandbar?

Can you see the family on the sandbar?

Their boat bobbing in the bay

Their boat, bobbing in the bay

I should explain that this beach stretches all the way back to Tavira.  You can reach it by catching the ferry from Cabanas, and the beach will be much busier nearer to that resort.  A very long beach walk would eventually bring you to this spot.  In the winter months that or swimming across would be the only way to get here.  Or a boat taxi, of course.

In the opposite direction, the beach rolls all the way to Spain, but first you have to cross over a channel.  A boat is a very useful thing to own in this part of the world.  Speaking of which, here comes the ferry.

We leave behind Cacela Velha

We leave Cacela Velha behind

And head back to Fabrica

And head back to Fabrica

The end of our walk?  Well, first we might have a snack at one of the beach bars.  Then I’m going to show you the view from Cacela Velha over to ‘our’ beach, just to give you a sense of place.  It’s only a half hour walk along the road to Cacela Velha or, if the tide’s not too high, you can walk the strip of beach that hugs the cliff.  You’d then have to climb the steps to the village.

Sitting at a Fabrica beach bar

Sitting at a Fabrica beach bar

And there you have it- the view from the fort

And here you have it- the view from the fort!

Across to 'our' beach

Across to ‘our’ beach

And there's even a bench to enjoy the view

And there’s even a bench to enjoy the view

Thanks for humoring me with this boat ride and saunter along the sands.  My earlier walk gives you a land-based version, if you’re not a lover of boats.  In either case, the views won’t disappoint.  In the world’s top 15?  I think there’d be strong competition. But I enjoyed it very much, and I hope you did too.

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Thank you very much for all your support, and lovely comments.  I have a fine time walking with you every week.  If you’d like to join me, details are on my Jo’s Monday walk page or just a click on the logo above.  Next comes the good bit.  Put the kettle on and get ready for a good read!

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Humble apologies are due!  I forgot to include this walk last week, so please rush over there first :

Urban Walk 2- Toronto Cityscape

Totally opposite in every way- beach shots to die for with Anabel!

Faraid Head

You can walk, or take the train.  Either way, you’re bound to love the views!

A Walk in the Cinque Terre

Amy’s world is beautiful!  Have you noticed?

Monday Walk : Architecture Walk, Austin, part 4

I’ve heard so many good things about Berlin.  Let’s take a look, shall we?

Day 1- Dublin to Germany

A trip back in time with Drake this week?  Any trip with Drake is good!

Yesterday, nowadays

And now for something completely different.  Many thanks, Elena!

Renaissance Fair in Las Vegas

You wouldn’t get this level of activity on a UK beach ever, I don’t think!  Lazy, aren’t we, Pauline?

Early Morning Beach Activities

Ruth has a totally fascinating tour for us this week.  One not to miss :

Port Arthur Convict Settlement

The highlight of Geoff’s post for me is Wimbledon Park tube station.  A blast from my youth!

Capital Ring- Earlsfield to Richmond

Jude always shares beautiful walks but she has really blown me away with this contribution!

A Walk on a Wild Ridge

If you really want to test your fitness levels, this could be the place :

A Tale of Two Peaks- Part 2

Once in a while I find something a bit different.  For the foodies among you- say ‘hi’ to Ishita :

Iva’s Yummy Ljubljananjam Food Walk

Talking about unusual, thanks for these ‘wild’ animals in the city, Becky!

Panthers in Pittsburgh

I haven’t had a stroll with my friend Esther for a while.  Sing along, won’t you?

Walk- Down the Canyon

The title of this next post could really have described mine, but they couldn’t be more different!

Walking, Sailing, Walking, Wading

And you can always rely on Gilly to find the beauty in life :

A Green Circle Walk

Or maybe a stroll in sunny Munich will suit?  Thanks, Rosemay!

Nymphenburg The Summer Palace

Lastly, Denzil does his very best to give us a smile on a grey day :

Grey day in Grez-Doiceau

Lots this week, aren’t there?  I do hope you can find the time to visit, and many thanks to all of you for keeping me such good company.  I have one more Algarve walk in reserve, but next week I’m going to hurl myself into an English Autumn, before it passes me by.  I’d love for you to join me. Have a great week, won’t you?

All at sea

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All at sea!

Wipeout!

Wipeout!

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Licking and licking,

With a greedy salted tongue.

Restrained by the tide

Adrift

Adrift

A starfish, rooted out of its home

Uprooted from home

A battle for survival

Battling for survival

Learning new skills

Learning new skills

And mastering them

And mastering them

Boys, ready for action

Poised, ready for action

Ships that pass...

Ships that pass…

I’m not sure quite where this wistful post came from.  It started life as a tribute to Lazy Poet’s Thursday Haiku and somehow morphed. Just me, rambling on Algarve beaches.  But this week, Gilly has the most beautiful Tanka.  Do go and see.

 

Jo’s Monday walk : Vila Nova de Milfontes

Looking down from the castelo at Vila Nova de Milfontes

Looking down from the castelo of Vila Nova de Milfontes

I don’t know what it is about castles and beaches but they seem to me a very pleasing combination.  And the one above, in the Alentejo, isn’t the only one I found.  But we have to start somewhere so today I thought I’d take you over the Algarve border, and on up the western coastline of Portugal.  I have been to this area before but never so far as Vila Nova de Milfontes.

Situated at the mouth of the River Mira, the presence of the castle tells you that it was not always so peaceful here. Forte de São Clemente still has a drawbridge.  Dating back to 1485, the town had a key defensive role to play, and the wide estuary provided a safe harbour.  Today it’s not pirates we have to fear so much as tourists.  The town is part of the Southwest Alentejo and Costa Vicentina national park, which stretches all the way down the coast and into the Algarve.  As such it enjoys a good measure of protection, and development is largely low rise.

Not for nothing is this known as the windy coast, and in my short visit it was highly apparent that this could be a cool spot. (the wind sometimes whistled in the corners of my hotel)  But I also experienced some lovely sunshine, so let’s take a wander through the town.

We'll start here in the shade of the castle

We’ll start here in the shade of the castle

There’s a tiny square,  Praça da Barbacã, very atmospheric at night, which looks down on the ferry point.  A rather strange sculpture has pride of place.  It pays tribute to the role played locally in aviation between Portugal and Macau in the Far East.

This is the nicest part of town, as you wander gently uphill through a mix of older houses and new.  There’s a small, simple church and a few gift shops.  What appears to be a tiny cafe turns out to be a 3 storey Tardis, serving food to half the town, myself included!  I meander along, past ochre and immaculate blue and white, letting my eye drift, as it does.

But wait!  There are surprises in store.

I thought that there must be some kind of scarecrow festival going on, but this was the only evidence I found.  Just one ‘spooky’ street, with an interesting shop or two for delving.

Or a seahorse with attitude?

Maybe a seahorse with attitude?

This looks like a good place to stay

And on the street corner, a good-looking place to stay

Pausing, I look down to the right and catch a glimpse of water.  Like a magnet, I’m drawn.

Looking back you can see the road bridge spanning the River Mira which brings you into town, but ahead the estuary opens out. Locals race against the tide to winkle out errant shellfish. Beneath my feet, a shelf of lavishly coloured rock.

Gazing out to sea

Gazing out to sea

And here's the ferry point. It's lunch hour!

And here’s the ferry point, at lunch hour

A group of backpackers sit in the shade.  I wonder where they’re off to next.  It feels like a transient place, and I know that there are beaches aplenty, just waiting.

Time to mount the steps back to the castelo

Time to mount the steps back to the castelo- not too arduous!

And this is your reward!

And here you have your reward!

I hope you enjoyed our morning amble.  That fresh sea air always does me a power of good.  The resort has probably stayed so peaceful because it’s quite a distance from the nearest airport, Lisbon, and you would probably need to drive there.

Time to share some walks.  Got the kettle on?

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Some of these folks have had a long wait to be included this week, so apologies if you’ve already been there.  Please do visit them if you haven’t.  If you’d like to join in, details can be found on my Jo’s Monday walk page.  Just click on the logo.  You’ll be very welcome.

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Let’s start the ball rolling with Bratislava.  Wouldn’t I love to accompany Debbie there?  This is SO pretty!

No Feeling Blue Here

Blue skies in the Shetlands for Anabel.  Lucky, or what?

Jarlshof to Sumburgh Head

Car boot sale anyone?  Actually Violet’s calling it a Farmer’s Market :

To market, to market

Random but very enjoyable rambles with Jackie and Frida Kahlo :

Monday’s Walk

Fairmont Banff Springs!  Sadly this luxury is not for me, but just look at Amy’s photos!

Monday Walk : Castle in the Wilderness (2)

Drake pays a wonderful tribute to ‘strong women’ :

The shades of Joan of Arc

And, in my absence, he took a little walk with the Beatles!

Nowhere walk

While Jaspa takes us strolling ‘down South America way’ :

The Streets of Santiago, Chile

Jill takes us for a fun wander (and I think there’s street art too)

Auckland City on a good day

What do Errol Flynn and Hobart have in common?  Find out with Ruth!

A walk around Battery Point

Fascination and excitement from the Southern hemisphere!  You’ll find it with Laia :

Rotorua: Maori culture and geothermal activity

And please welcome another ‘fit person’ to my walks.  You may have difficulty keeping up!

Memories of Ireland: Mount Brandon

Jude has excelled herself in my absence, with 3 new walks!  The most recent one unfortunately ended with a limp.

Garden Portrait : RHS Wisley part 1

Garden Portrait : RHS Wisley part 2

A painful memory or two here from Jude- suffering for her art!

Garden Portrait : Painshill Park

Unfortunately I won’t be walk leading next Monday as I’ll still be recovering from a Polish wedding.  I’m only gone a few days and hope to be back on track after that.  Seriously!  Meantime you might like to keep an eye on those lovely lasses at Monday Escapes.  Take care, and enjoy your walking!

 

 

Six word Saturday

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Hello, and how are you all?

The 'tents' return to Tavira

The ‘tents’ return to Tavira

What a fortnight, but what to select to show you what I’ve been up to?  In brief, of course.  More by luck than planning, the Mediterranean Diet Fair took place whilst I was in Tavira, which accounts for those little white tents and the variety of goodies within. It marked the end of an extremely hot Summer, in which the evenings were soothed by riverside entertainment.

The floodlit castle walls took on a magic of their own

The floodlit castle walls took on a magic of their own

And the churches opened their doors to show everyone the beauty inside

And the churches opened their doors to show everyone the beauty inside

Including the incomparable beauty of the Misericordia Church

Including the incomparable beauty of the Misericordia Church

With its wonderful azulejo panels

With its wonderful azulejo panels

The days were spent mostly wandering beaches.  I discovered a new obsession with buoys.  And I continued my exploration along the west coast of Portugal, up into the beautiful Alentejo.

Zambueira do Mar in the Alentejo

Zambueira do Mar in the Alentejo

Then there was the excitement that was the Medieval Fair at Castro Marim, with both castelo and mighty fortress an arena for combat, and an array of stalls and distractions.  Plus an evening of sand sculptures at FIESA.

Adding colour to Beethoven at FIESA

Adding colour to Beethoven at FIESA

I even managed to combine Morning Glory for Gilly with a hint of metal bench for Jude!  Yes, it was a fine holiday, and there are many tales to tell.  Gilly is going to the Algarve soon herself, and Jude always extends a warm welcome, so pop in and say ‘hi’ to them both.

A bench at Cacela Velha

A bench at Cacela Velha

I have to decide where to take you walking on Monday, and then I have a wedding in Poland, so I’ll miss Six word Saturday again next week.  I hope you’ve all had a great Summer, and if you’d like to share it with Cate I’m sure she’d be pleased.  See you soon!

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Six word Saturday

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Benches at the beach- for Jude

What's not to like?

Quite tropical looking, isn’t it?

I’m well aware that I haven’t taken you to the Algarve for a while.  Don’t worry!  The photos are there, in a folder.  A little laid back time on the beach would be lovely, wouldn’t it?

Today is just a glimpse.  I seem to have caught the Bench bug, and it’s all thanks to my friend, Jude.  May is her month for benches at the beach.  With just one day of May to go, I thought I should post these.  Jude will be happy as a sand boy, because right now she’s playing on Cornish beaches.  Do pay her a visit.  Maybe you have a bench for next month’s challenge?

This morning I have a little sunshine, too.  Got to make the most of it, before Sunday whisks it away!  Wishing you a happy weekend, and please don’t forget to share your six words with Cate.

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