Jo’s Monday walk

Jo’s Monday walk : Wollaton Hall

Just one more beautiful piece of English Heritage, before I move on.  I’ve jumped counties this week, to Nottinghamshire and an Elizabethan country house, Wollaton Hall, dating from the 1580s.  The sturdy old entrance gate looks anything but welcoming but, beyond it, 500 acres of parkland wrap gently around this elegant house on a hill.  Lime Tree Walk sweeps gracefully upwards, but I’m diverted by the activity down at the lake.

An aloof swan or two, some cheerful coots and a waddle of ducks glide around the lemon and white water lilies, on a well nigh perfect summer’s day.  The lake, just big enough to consume an icecream as you walk around it.

The park is also home to herds of Red and Fallow deer, some of whom astonished me by treading nonchalantly across the adjacent golf course.  It must be a common occurrence, for the golfers appeared unperturbed.

There are formal gardens too, out of reach of the deer, but Wollaton is best known as Nottingham’s Natural History Museum.  I’m really not fond of stuffed animals, but had to venture inside the hall out of curiosity.  I was glad I did.  In parts it was very beautiful.

It being the summer holidays, the hall was full of distractions for children.  My daughter, long past childhood but a child at heart, still likes to twirl a bat cape alongside Bruce Wayne.  Batman Forever!  Wollaton regularly hosts events, and has been used as a film set on several occasions, understandably looking at this staircase.  There appeared to be dinosaurs in residence, too.

I was interested to read of the behind the scenes tours available at the house,  including a ‘descent to the depths’ to discover the Tudor Kitchen and the Admiral’s Bath!  I averted my eyes from much of the taxidermy, but stopped to read Len’s story, and some history of the hall.

You can also access the roof for a closer look at the Pavilion Towers.  Or how about a Bat Walk, or ghost tour?  There have to be a few skeletons in the cupboards around here, wouldn’t you think?

We had some ace cake eaters in our company that day.  Sampling is a public service, after all.  Fortunately standards were met in the Courtyard.

Within the courtyard I also found something quite fascinating- an ancient knitting machine, on loan from the Framework Knitters Museum at Ruddington.  All in all, a very satisfying afternoon out.

And there you have it!  A bundle of very happy memories from an English summer.

walking logo

Time to share this week’s walks.  You have to admit, there’s variety here.  And if you want to add something of your own, you know where to find me.  Jo’s Monday walk explains it all.  Join me here any time.

……………………………………………………………………………

Let’s start with Debbie.  I remember this place as being wonderfully atmospheric :

A dawdle down under – In Liverpool

What is it about Cornwall that makes its gardens so beautiful?  Jude might know :

Heligan

More colourful characters from Janet this week :

Jo’s Monday walk…going to the dogs

Wonder what Jackie’s been eating?

Road Grill

Stroll round ‘Kyoto’s Kitchen’ with Lady Lee :

Nishiki Market

Irene takes us to a beautiful place :

Along the Shores

Step by step, Cathy crosses Northern Spain, meeting a few characters along the way :

(Camino day 34) Astorga to Rabanal del Camino

And I made a new acquaintance in Marsi.  The views are stupendous, but you need to be fit!

Smith Rock State Park: Oregon’s Rock climbing Mecca & Dreamy Day hike destination

I’ve been back in the Algarve for 3 weeks now, settling into a rhythm of sorts.  I hope you’ll hang around to enjoy it with me.  Take care, all!

Jo’s Monday walk : Lotherton Hall

I’m still in garden mode today.  That’s what inevitably comes from a visit to England.  At the suggestion of two good friends a jaunt out to a rather wonderful Edwardian country estate took place.  Celebrating 50 years of being open to the public, Lotherton Hall is a pleasant ride out of Leeds City Centre on the number 64 bus.  Amazing how quickly you can leave the city behind and be surrounded by rolling English countryside and pretty villages.  And wonder of wonders, the sun was beaming down!  Gardens first, in case the weather changed its mind.

The hall was once owned by the Gascoigne family and the formal gardens were designed between 1893 and 1914.  The rose terrace is overlooked by a remarkable bronze sculpture, ‘Peony Priest’.  I didn’t take as many photos as I normally would because I was in excellent company, and there was much catching up to do.  As well as that, a Vintage Fair had taken pride of place in the gardens.  Stalls with all manner of garments, glassware, china and books filled the lawns.  A little browsing and, to save the contents of our purses, you understand, it was into the Coach House for coffee (and a scone with jam and cream  🙂  ).

A tiny chapel in the grounds is dedicated to St. James and dates back to 1170.  It was restored during the First World War for the use of soldiers recuperating at Lotherton.  The serenity must have seemed a boon to them.

Elsewhere in the grounds a Beatles Tribute Band was tuning up.  Serenity destroyed, but there were lots of toe tappers.  Our visit to the hall was accompanied by the familiar strains of ‘It’s been a Hard Day’s Night’.  It was all I could do not to join in the chorus as I looked through the window.

The hall itself truly captured my imagination.  It brings to life another era, and tells the stories of the Gascoignes and the families that worked for them, in an ‘Upstairs Downstairs’ fashion.  Sir Alvary Gascoigne had a highly successful diplomatic career and this is reflected in the exquisite furniture and fabulous chinoiserie throughout the house.

I’m sure that many people would enjoy this step back in time, but the Lotherton Hall experience doesn’t end there.  An enormous range of birds, many of which I have never seen before, inhabit the aviary.  Moving from one compound to the next presented continuous surprises.  I’m not a fan of zoos in general, but there were lots of happy children and their parents in the park.

We’d done a lot of wandering and it was time for a substantial meal.  My friend’s suggestion of the ‘Crooked Billet’ pub, just 1.6 miles away, was a huge success.  The proof of the pudding is in the eating, isn’t it?  And surely Eton Mess can’t be fattening!

Their only son is getting married this Friday.  I wish him and his bride a wonderful life together, and hope they’ll be as happy as his Mum and Dad.

walking logo

More walks to share this week.  Thank you all for contributing and for reading.  Join me any time you like, here on Jo’s Monday walk.

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

I’m stealing from a master this week.  I’m sure most of you will know the work of Lignum Draco :

Le Mont Saint-Michel

And, just over the water, Jude focuses on what she does best- a Cornish garden :

Trelissick Garden in Summer

While Margaret does her best to cheer us, with a dash of ‘je ne sais quoi’ :

Le Jardin Extraordinaire : a late summer treat

This lady never ceases to amaze me with the places she goes, and the resulting photographs :

A stroll around a stadium

While Lady Lee has the best holidays ever :

Kinkaku-ji (Temple of the Golden Pavilion)

A challenging walk from Cheryl, but well worth it, I know you’ll agree :

Hyangiram Hermitage Hike in Summer

While Irene takes us to some stunning heights in Hawaii :

Top of Diamond Head

And Teabee reminds me of the beauty of English heather :

Randonée/Hike to High Rigg, St. John’s in the Vale, Cumbria

Alice’s turn to take us through some locks this week  :

Lockport Flight of Five

Drake shares another snippet of his fascinating life :

Not bad but Baden-Wurt..Berg

And Janet demonstrates her fondness for animals :

Jo’s Monday Walk…the dog days of summer

If you’re just feeling lazy, Sandra has the answer :

Afternoon Tea at the Empress, Victoria, BC

But Cathy strides on with determination in every step :

(Camino day 33) Hospital de Orbigo to Astorga

Nothing left to do but wish you all a great week.  See you soon!

Jo’s Monday walk : Kirkstall Abbey to Leeds City Centre

What could be finer, on an almost sunny day, than a little piece of English Heritage, topped off with a canalside walk?  Numerous times I have passed by the ruins of Kirkstall Abbey, with a backward look and a sigh.  Founded in 1152, over 800 years ago, this Cistercian monastery is surrounded by greenery and sits on the banks of the River Aire.

All summer long Leeds City Council have provided activities to keep youngsters active and entertained.  Kirkstall Abbey was one of the venues, in case you were wondering about the terrier.  He was watching me with curiosity as I read the signboards and imagined how life must have been, back in those draughty days.

A short, sharp shower forced us across the road and into the Abbey House tearooms.  Excellent timing for a huge slice of carrot cake.

I was astonished to learn that the main road into Leeds had once passed through the Abbey.  Today it buzzes and hums alongside, but a far quieter route into town can be found just a few hundred metres beyond, along the Leeds-Liverpool canal.

Leaving the Abbey to its own devices, I meandered across the grass to join the riverside path.  Youngsters were trying to span the river, with whoops of laughter, at a narrow point among the trees.  Beyond the weir it wasn’t immediately obvious how to reach the towpath, and I ended up on a rugby pitch, with some rusty containers.  Big hint- it is necessary to cross over the river to access the canal.

You never know what you’ll find on, or in, a canal.  Discarded gaiety from the day before, an old lad and his equally old boat, nuts and bolts and bridges, and a dad, wheeling the pushchair in search of peace and quiet.

Waterside weeds aplenty, dappled shade, a pigeon under a bridge, looking wary, and a timely reminder of distance.  Today’s walk, just a fraction of that.  Suddenly welcome sunshine flooded the canal with brilliant light, and simultaneously I passed by a small marina.

Close by, the traffic thundered over bridges, but in this watery world all was stillness and calm, with patches of ugliness.  Angled shots seemed to suit the confined space, reflecting the heavy girders with ease.

Approaching Leeds centre many of the old warehouses have been converted, but there are still sad facades with bleak-looking, shattered windows.  A museum peers down from behind railings.  Spare patches of wall host graffiti.  The canal trundles silently, nurturing its wildlife.

The railway joins the canal and the road network, and gradually everything converges on the city.  A sequence of locks steers you through it’s very heart.  The conviviality of the canals always draws people together, and I love this about them.

 

I have to apologise for being a bit ‘all over the place’ right now.  Many of you will know that I am back in my Algarve home, after spending most of August in the UK.  Events have overtaken me, but I have a few ambles still to share from my time in England.

walking logo

As always, many thanks to you all for following my wandering footsteps.  I hope you can spare some time to visit my walkers.  I can promise variety!  Join me next time, on Jo’s Monday walk?  You’re always very welcome.

……………………………………………………………………………………..

Jude’s back with us this week, sharing beautiful Cornwall :

A Walk on the Wildside

Denzil’s shifted his focus a little lately, but the details are, as always, excellent :

Doode Bemde, Neerijse

Debbie always finds such interesting subjects for her walks :

An amble in Another Place

A beautifully written walk from Mel, with some great historic background :

Escape Sydney’s Concrete Jungle on the Wulugul Walk

And by contrast, Joanne shares some very English heritage and sights :

Canterbury Tales and Trails

There isn’t any shortage of beautiful cities in Europe, is there?  Thanks, Drake!

The invisible bridge city

Janet shares a lovely picture storyboard this week :

Framing Wyoming: walk with me

While Natalie keeps our fitness in mind, in a beautiful setting :

Fit n Fun Walk: Toronto Music Garden

And Jackie has a very different focus :

But First, Dessert

Ann-Christine reflects on our topsy-turvy world :

Thursday Thoughts – Iceland, Life on Earth and at Sea

Lady Lee’s back from a fabulous holiday :

All Seasons – Our Japanese Holiday

While poor Cathy just keeps right on walking!

(Camino day 32) Valverde de la Virgen to Hospital de Orbigo

There’s walking, and then there’s Lexie!  This is an unbelievable effort.  You will be amazed!

Battling a Mountain

That’s it for another week.  I plan a slow day today as the weekend was hot and hectic.  Whatever you find to do, take good care of yourself.

Jo’s Monday walk : Carvoeiro Boxes

In complete contrast to Saturday’s post, I’m sun-dazzled in Carvoeiro today.  Not my favourite place in the Algarve but, after the enormous success of my Street Art in Silves, I made it a mission to visit Carvoeiro for more of the same.  Most of its charm fled with the influx of tourism, but in winter months you might still catch a glimmer.  Just don’t attempt it in high summer!

You can forgive a lot with street art like this, can’t you?  I wandered through the centre, beaming at each new find.

Do you have a favourite yet?  I confess a weakness for the frog.  A handsome prince if ever I saw one.

The background can enhance or distract, the musculature of Ronaldo seeming a little out of place beside that delicate chimney.  But he’s everywhere in Portugal. Sometimes it’s good to see things in context, like this box outside the mosaic shop.  And the lovely azulejo panel of the bay.

Just a morsel of cake.  Not my preferred choice but very nice.  However disparaging I may be about Carvoeiro, there’s a place just along the coast that never fails to delight me, even though commercialism has done its worst.  The awe I felt when I first saw Algar Seco remains.

Fashioned by the raw power of the sea, the convoluted shapes and whorls cast a spell.  A gentle whoosh, or a blast and a roar!  The ocean always keeps you on your toes.  You can follow the boardwalk along the cliff top to take in the views, or descend to peer through the lattice of holes.

The painted electricity boxes were there too.  I hope you enjoyed them.

walking logo

I’ve tried to catch up with as many of you as I can.  Please give me a nudge if I’ve missed you.  It’s meltingly hot in the Algarve right now, so I’m glad of those cooler weeks in the UK.  Many thanks for your company and contributions.  Feel free to join me next time here on Jo’s Monday walk.

………………………………………………………………………………………….

Debbie captures the action on the streets of Edinburgh.  What a venue!

Foray into the Fringe

A North Korean history lesson and a stroll by the shore with Albert :

Jipsam Revolutionary Site

A glass of wine or two, and a trilogy, with Drake :

On the top

Down by the corner

Comfort zone

Beautiful gardens to wander in, with Sandra :

Butchart Gardens, Victoria, BC, Canada

While Irene enjoys a quiet life :

Morning of Peacefulness

Take a Closer Look

And Beatrice shares the natural beauty of Austria, courtesy of Ulli :

Alpine Flora and Fauna in Montafon Valley, Austria

This one from Eunice seems very appropriate this week (and note it’s a sequel)

More of Blackburn’s street art

And Cathy is still walking the Camino, one step at a time :

(Camino day 30) Arcahueja to León

(Camino day 31) Léon to Valverde de la Virgen

I couldn’t resist this walk in Paris.  Please say hello to Yoshimi :

Paris Promenade plantée Coulée verte

Rosemay visits one of my favourite places in Yorkshire :

A Spring Walk round Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal

And how could you not enjoy a port or two, in Becky’s convivial company?

Discovering Vila Nova de Gaia

But if none of that pleases you, take a trip with Sheetal.  You won’t regret it!

To Rome, with love 

Hope you’re having a wonderful Bank Holiday in the UK, and wishing you all a great week ahead.  I’m still battling gently with the new phone, but I had some great news yesterday.  My son proposed to his lovely lady, on holiday in Barcelona, and she said ‘si’.  🙂

Jo’s Monday walk : Vila Franca do Campo

So!  The dilemma!  Our last night, close to the airport for an early start, or a beguiling monastery, not too far away?  When we rang the bell pull at dusk, and the narrow grill rolled slowly back, we could have been forgiven for wondering if we’d made the right choice.  A small door in the hefty green one was swung creakily back to admit us.  Were we spending the night in a cell?

Vila Franca do Campo was full of surprises.  On our bed, at Convento de Sáo Francisco, a glossy magazine, open at a feature… are you familiar with Bom Jesus at Braga, on mainland Portugal?  The image was something similar, but on a smaller scale.  Definitely an expedition for the morning.

On a bright blue day, yet another amiable taxi driver arrived to wind us up, and up, and up the hillside to Senhora da Paz. (and he would collect us at six for the airport, the following morning, still smiling  🙂  )  Breakfast of island cheeses, boiled eggs, fresh pineapple and wonderful local bread and honey had set us up for the day.  Nothing to do but start at the top, and amble slowly, back down the hillside.

The views down upon Vila Franca do Campo, with its offshore islet, were simply beautiful, the subtle stripes of the ocean stretching to infinity.  The azulejo panels tell the story of Our Lady of Peace, whose image was discovered nearby, in a simple grotto.

Reluctantly I tore myself away to begin the descent.  Mingled with the ever present hydrangeas, starry bursts of delicate agapanthus.

Did you notice the islet, on the horizon?  I didn’t manage to get there in the short time we had, but the ferries leaving the marina seemed popular.  But I’m jumping ahead of myself.  We wound our way down a tree-lined avenue until we were back in the town.  The houses had interesting adornments to delay our progress, and one garden was full of ripening bananas.  Most noticeable, though, were the coloured hoops across the streets.  A festival of some kind was set to happen, connected to the Senhora, I could only surmise.

Eventually the twists and turns brought us to a central square, and thirst led us from there to the marina.  A hot and lively place from which to observe the business of boats.  Something I’m able to do for hours!

A seawall led out around the marina, protecting it from an ocean mild as milk on this particular day.  We stopped to watch some youngsters bringing home their tiny craft, the instructor bellowing at them intimidatingly.  I was glad that I was ashore.

So many fascinating jobs to be done.  But not everybody loves boats, and it was time to follow the shoreline and head back up to our monastery/hotel.  Evidence here that someone loves cars too!

Through a very attractive square, whose church door was temptingly open.  And past the prettiest bandstand ever!

I think this may be a good place to leave this walk, though I hear anguished cries of ‘what about the cake?’  You can have too much of a good thing?

walking logo

I’m still in the UK till late Wednesday.  So much has happened since we were in the Azores!  I’m in transit to Nottingham tomorrow, and as some of you may realise, I’ve just hit Publish rather than Preview!  So you have a Jo’s Monday walk on a Saturday.  Whatever next?  I hope you’ll excuse me.  There will be a brief follow up on Monday.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Meanwhile, Cathy has been trekking, and trekking, on her spiritual journey :

(Camino day 27) San Nicolás del Real Camino to Bercianos del Real Camino

(Camino day 28) Bercianos del Real Camino to Reliegos & ruminations (week 4)

And Sandra has been enjoying the great outdoors :

Flowers, Berries and More

Naches Peak Loop/Tipsoo Lake, Mount Rainier National Park

I always enjoy a step back in time.  Thanks, Irene :

Sense of Nostalgia

Meet Elina from Finland!  She has some wonderful sights to show you :

Rainbow Mountain

And guess what?  Drake’s….

Back in town

And he has full permission to walk on a day that’s not Monday  🙂

Village with red touch

While Rupali, after a break, is…

Back on track

And Ulli takes us on a majestic tour of the Austrian Alps :

The route is the final destination in Austria

Funnily enough, Suzanne, the Travelbunny, just featured a spectacular walk in Austria that I’d love to do :

Tiefenbachklamm – Discovering Austria’s Wild Side

And Debbie takes us to ever more exotic and interesting places.  I can’t keep up!

Bender Fortress

I’m sure she’d enjoy some of the street art in Cheryl’s walk, too :

The Highest Café of Jaman Mural Village

Another newcomer to the walks- please give a warm welcome to Nandini :

A Walk on Golconda Fort

And in case you’ve forgotten Nadine, something that made me feel very restless :

15 Photos that will make you fall in love with the Camino del Norte

And I almost missed Margaret, but here she is!

Country Mouse visits the Big City

It’s great that you’ve all continued to walk with me.  Comments were closed for a while, but I guess I’m back in business now.  I’ve loved my family time in the UK but I think it will be good to be home again.

Capelas, Sáo Miguel- not quite a Monday walk

Sáo Miguel is quite a large island.  Needing a base from which to complete the walk around the rim of the volcano at Sete Cidades, I opted for the small village of Capelas, on the northwest coast.  Knowing nothing about it, once we’d checked into a lovely bungalow in the grounds of the Solar do Conde, it was time to explore.

A left turn took us towards the village, a walk of about 15 minutes.  A right turn led to a beautiful coastal path, according to our helpful hotel receptionist.  Village first, though the road was narrow and largely unpaved.

A sign suggested the name of Capelas comes from caves dug into the rocks by the often boisterous sea, the caves resembling chapels.  The art of the bandstand seems to be alive and well here in the Azores.  We saw some beauties.  The tile panels are equally beautiful throughout Portugal.

Certainly, the cliffs were high, and the sea a little boisterous.  Nor did the tiny port look an easy place to dock.  The square outside the church seemed a pleasant place to sit and watch village life, the locals lazing away a warm afternoon.  The church was still open so I popped inside.

We ambled back to the hotel, where a pool awaited.  Rather a nice one, too, but I couldn’t sit still for very long.  What about that right turn?  Leaving the other half to idle a while, I picked up the camera and sauntered off again.

Sure enough, the coastal path led far away into the distance.  I didn’t have much time before supper, but I can never resist the whoosh of waves.

As I approached the bathing area the clouds were beginning to gather again.  It seemed like a good time to turn for that evening’s ‘home’.

walking logo

Jo’s Monday walk is going to be missing for 3 weeks or more while I’m in the UK, so I’ve decided to include the walks I’ve already accumulated this week, here.  It’s hard to keep track of them otherwise.  Feel free to keep them coming.  I have one last lovely place in the Azores to share with you.  I’ll post it when I can, but have no idea when that might be.

……………………………………………………………………………………..

State of the art, and a few gymnastics with Janet, to get us started :

Monday walk… out and about in Sheridan

Not a walk so much as a ride with Sue, but you’ve gotta love her :

Azorean ruin

The irrepressible Jackie offers up…

Two Scoops

I mostly saw it in the rain, but Natalie had much better luck :

Day Trip to Salzburg, Austria

Boats, oysters, marshlands… Alice has it all!

Pin Point

Tiptoe through a chateau, with Drake?

Art in the countryside

A city gate, and a little history from Ulli :

A Promenade through old Beeskow, Germany

Terri admits she’s a little obsessed with fitness, but you have to admire her dedication :

No Excuses Fitness : Exercising with a Cast

How’s about this for a bridge, on many levels?  Thanks, Carol!

Over, Under and Back Again

Sweltering heat seems to have been universal lately.  Enjoy a cooling Algarve stroll with Becky :

Down by the river

Thanks for your company, and your patience.  Have a great Summer, or ‘roll on Spring!’ depending where you are in the world.  See you soon!

Jo’s Monday walk : Sete Cidades

I was going to save this walk till the end of my Azores saga, but it feels right to include it now.  You could say that the entire purpose of coming to these islands was to see the lakes at Sete Cidades with my own eyes.  Could they really be as beautiful as they appeared in the photographs?

They’re back on the main island, Sáo Miguel, a short flight from Faial.  Standing on the runway at Horta airport, looking across the water at Pico, I had to wonder if this second week was going to be an anticlimax.  I needn’t have worried.  Very little about the Azores disappoints.  A smiling taxi driver had whisked us from Ponta Delgada airport to our luxury hotel and thermal spa at Furnas (more about that later) and from there to the north west of the island.  The unfailing good humour and willingness to help of the taxi drivers never ceased to amaze.  En route, Maciel stopped to let us look at Lagoa do Fogo, whetting our appetite for the main event.

As so often, I got it right, but I got it wrong first!  The area is full of smaller lakes and, thinking to save our legs, the amiable driver paused briefly at Lagoa do Canario on the way up the mountain.  A quick, sunny look, and back in the car.  I had read that the viewing point Vista do Rei (King’s View) was a must see, and asked him to drop us off there.  It was growing increasingly cloudy and I was in dread of a repetition of our visit to the Caldeira on Faial, when we didn’t see a thing.  The clouds wafted around and I waited for that golden moment when the sun hits the water.  Almost in vain!  It was time to start walking, back in the direction we had come from.  Gradually the clouds melted, leaving us to hike a warm 3km along the switchback of a roadside.   The one saving grace was that it afforded us views we otherwise would have missed.

Sete Cidades from Vista do Rei

Mountain weather is predictably erratic and I had my fingers firmly crossed when we finally reached the beginning of the trail, PR4.  It makes an 11km circuit of the two main lakes, Lagoa Azul and Lagoa Verde, after a bit of a steep climb.  Understatement!

I hadn’t known that there was rather a delightful surprise waiting for us.  A wonderful old, moss-covered aqueduct, Muro das Nove Janelas.

I gawped at it from every angle, before beginning the upward slog, gentle at first but soon arriving at a semi-vertical, narrow paved section, which led up, and up!  A couple of farmers climbed effortlessly ahead of us, turning off the path part way to herd the cattle to different pastures.

What a reward for effort!  As we climbed higher more of the lakes became visible, despite the lurking clouds.  At the top we heaved a sigh of satisfaction.  There before us spread four of the lakes, including Lagoa do Canario, our starting point.

Now all we needed to do was follow the rim of the volcano.  The trail upped and downed a little, and at one point we simply sat on a rock and gazed.  I can’t be sure but there may even have been a chocolate biscuit involved.  The view was too stunning to care.

Looking back the cloud still lingered but, as we made our way around the rim, more and more of Lagoa Azul and Lagoa Verde were revealed.  The light danced across the water, tracing patterns and changing colours on a whim.  On the horizon, the wild Atlantic, becalmed.

Wild flowers created beautiful borders for me, until finally I found what I had been hoping for- a wonderful spread of hydrangeas.

Gradually we came back down.  I had run out of superlatives and my feet were weary.  It seemed to take an inordinate time to reach the lakeside- we’d been walking about 4 hours- and as we did the cloud rolled back in.

How did the area come to be called Sete Cidades or Seven Cities?  It’s a historical reference, explained fully in the link, with explanations of the volcanic activity which gave rise to the lakes.  For us the big question was how to get to our next destination.  The only taxi in the village was busy, but the lady in the TI assured us he would come in half an hour.  He was late, but smiling, and singing to himself as he drove us back down the mountain, into the sunshine.

walking logo

The year is flying by, and one of the reasons I’ve chosen this walk is that it’s likely to be my last for a few weeks.  Next Monday I will be in England with a lively 6 year old to entertain.  Great fun but not conducive to lengthy posts.  I’d like to finish my Azores series this week, but there still seems so much to show you.  I’ll be away for 3 weeks so Jo’s Monday walk will be temporarily suspended.  Please do enjoy the following :

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

All this lies on Lynn’s doorstep.  And orchids too!  What a privilege :

Local Walks: Kukutali Preserve

Carol has been walking with difficulty lately, but she can still contribute a wonderful browse around a market :

Let’s Go Shopping!

Drake honours the departed, 75 years on :

Remembrance of partnership

The island of Maui, seen through Irene’s eyes :

Just a Glance

While Alice has found us the prettiest little lighthouse :

Rear Range Lighthouse 1879

Beautiful views, with Janet, whichever direction you look :

Monday walk… Look out!

Anne tells an interesting tale of quarries and disaster :

Coombe Down and the story of Bath Stone

While Candy is exploring the green spaces of Deptford :

Margaret McMillan Park in Deptford

And from one Margaret to another…  🙂

Tabariane: New Light on the Dark Ages revisited

Golden light streaming from this one of Cathy’s :

(Camino day 26) Calzadilla de la Cuenza to San Nicolás del Real Camino

I don’t know that this totally fits the bill, but I think Ann-Christine would agree that these are Dreamy landscapes.  Certainly I dreamed of seeing them for a long time.  And Cathy has an ongoing Photography Invitation you might like to join?  Have a great week!