sea glass

Six Word Saturday

6ws-participating-in-banner

Not easy to find in Seaham?

img_6655

You’d think that a bleak north eastern beach would be a good place to find a little Solitude, wouldn’t you?  Strangely enough, that isn’t the case. This particular beach has become a mecca for sea glass hunters and gatherers.   img_6644

You could hide out in the caves with a fair chance of solitude, but they’re not very safe. Erosion has created some fascinating shapes, though.

img_6659

img_6661

So your best bet is to head as far down the beach as you can go, without getting your feet wet, that is.  Even there, a far from home Devon artist was determinedly hunting through the pebbles, looking for sea glass.

img_6669

This is the lure, at the end of the beach.  A solitary and beautiful rock, leaning out to sea. Seeking its own solitude.

img_6689

There’s always a way to find solitude, if you crave it.  For me, it’s an essential part of life.  A bit like the Weekly Photo Challenge.

I hope this weekend brings you whatever you require.  Cate usually requires six words on a Saturday, but often she gets more.

6wsButton

Jo’s Monday walk : Back on the beach

IMG_3574

Whenever we go walking on our north east England coastline, we keep an idle eye open for sea glass.  Usually it’s in milky soft hues, but bottle green and turquoise are not unknown . The little chap above had us well fooled.  He’d obviously swum out of a child’s bucket, to twinkle up at us from the beach.

I won’t be walking with you next week, so I’m determined to leave you with some sunny images.  Last week was a little glum, wasn’t it?

IMG_3538

The other half wanders through the shot, distracting me from getting a level horizon.  The one below is better. (and minus my shadow!)

IMG_3539

The tide was advancing rapidly that day, and I had to do my famous teetering on rocks act, camera stowed safely in my pocket.  Why is it that he has so much better a sense of balance?  He kindly came back to hold my hand, or we might never have got there.

IMG_3544

It’s a coastline with an industrial past, so the rocks are always interestingly speckled and battered.  And there’s the sea glass to enjoy.

IMG_3547

IMG_3548

Not forgetting the occasional sea monster!  There’s one structure that always draws the eye.  Rotting timbers and frayed stumps simply add to the appeal of the magnificent remnants of Steetley Magnesite’s pier.

IMG_3576

IMG_3580

IMG_3586

IMG_3587

I never tire of shooting it, from all angles.  The last shot is a good example of convergence, isn’t it?  Sonel pointed one out to me the other day.  If you’re looking for photographic skill combined with creativity, hers is a great place to visit.

At this point you have a choice.  So long as the tide cooperates you can carry on along the craggy coastline, towards Crimdon Dene.

Sometimes the wind whips up, swirling the sands around you.  Click on the last photo in the gallery above and you’ll be able to make out the pier, in the far distance.  We’ve walked quite a way.  You can continue through the Dene, catching a bus back down the coast road, or you can retrace your steps along the beach.

Eventually you come back to Hartlepool Headland, with it’s proudly standing town walls. It’s been a safe haven for me for many a long year.  Look beyond the harbour, and on the horizon you can just make out the industry along Seal Sands Road, where we went seal spotting last week.

IMG_4960

On the Headland, Mary Rowntree’s tearooms have a lovely view across the harbour.  But I feel I know you well enough to invite you back to mine.  I’ll just pop the kettle on.  See you soon!

walking logo

My posting will be haphazard, to say the least, for the next month.  I’m deserting this safe haven for my familiar Algarve one, where I usually switch off from the world and its worries.  I hope to have another walk for you on Monday, 25th April, but just a few days after that I will be accompanying Dad to Poland for 2 weeks.  Another family visit and lots of smiles.

If, in the meantime, you’d like to share a walk, please feel free to do so, but be aware that I might not be able to share it for a while. Many thanks for your continuing support.  As usual, the logo above will take you to my Jo’s Monday walk page.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

SO excited to kick off this week with a walk by Lucile!  If you don’t know her, you’re in for a treat (and if you do, you’ll expect the best, and not be disappointed).  AND she’s in Portugal!

Walking through Sights and colours of Lisbon

Introducing a blog called MyScribblez next.  All scribblers amongst you, please pop over and say ‘hi’ :

Quebec on Foot

Drake likes the ladies, especially in an artful pose :

Blooming nudity

The scenery around Greenock is a nice surprise.  Take a look with Anabel :

The Greenock Cut

You won’t be surprised to find that Jackie likes shopping :

St. Lawrence Market

Or that Ellen has a badly behaved dinghy?  Maybe it’s been reformed since this post :

Going for a Walk : Coromandel Town (or Coro pies are best)

Smidge has some nice romantic looking photos from the Scottish Borders :

Dryburgh Abbey & The River Tweed

And Susan… how about close encounters with a good-looking cow or two?

Sadie’s Walk

Denzil got up at the crack of dawn for this walk, so he deserves your appreciation :

GR571 Stage 4 : Trois-Ponts to Vielsam 

And getting me nicely in the mood for the Algarve- thanks a lot, Becky!   Your place or mine?

Exploring the Grande Rota do Guadiana

That’s it folks!  Thanks again for all the shares and for the pleasure you give me.  Take care of yourselves.

 

 

 

Jo’s Monday walk : sea glass at Seaham

The outlook at Seaham Beach

The outlook on Seaham Beach

This week I’m taking you back to the north east coast of England, with a bit of a purpose.  I’ll explain more later but I need you to keep your eye open for sea glass.  The beach at Seaham is one of the best locations I know for finding it.

Between 1853 and 1921 Seaham was home to Europe’s largest glass bottle works, supplying millions of hand blown bottles.  Enormous amounts of waste glass were left at the end of each day, and this was generally thrown over the cliffs and into the sea.  More than a hundred years later, scrubbed smooth by the power of the water, we have sea glass in many shapes and colours.  Are you ready to hunt?

With more pebbles than you could ever want

With more pebbles than you could ever want

And among those pebbles, the precious bits of sea glass.  You can follow the beach round to the small harbour and the lighthouse, if you like, but I’m going in the opposite direction- north towards distant Sunderland.

There's a lot of beach to examine!

There’s rather a lot of beach to examine!

Rusted groynes litter the shore

Rusted groynes litter the shore

Filling up with pebbles too

Filling up with pebbles

Incongruously, some have been mended

Rather incongruously, some have been mended

Overhead, the cliffs menace!

While overhead, the cliffs menace!

Let’s get up close and personal with a few stones.  You never know what you might find.

We're looking for a hint of glitter

We’re looking for a hint of glitter

Unconcerned, a man walks his dog

Unconcerned, a man walks his dogs

What's this?  Look at the shimmer!

What’s this? Look at the shimmer!

I simply love the textures

I simply love the textures

You might remember we did something similar just south of here on Crimdon beach, a while ago, and ventured into some caves beneath the cliffs.  I’m drawn on along the endless beach, intrigued by my surroundings.  Dog walkers pass me by, with a nod and a smile, and occasionally children ferret on the beach.

Mindful of the dangers these crumbling cliffs can pose, still it’s hard not to be lured closer.

The cliff formations fascinate

The cliff formations fascinate

Torn and twisted as they are

Torn and twisted as they are

And here a table, nicely laid

And here a table, nicely laid

You know that I’m not going to be able to resist some close ups, but I treat the cliffs with due caution and the respect they deserve.  So should you!

I know that some of you are claustrophobic so I won’t linger.  The fascination of the shapes and vistas can keep me endlessly there on the shore, forgetting my purpose.  That morning a lady was standing, her dog patiently at heel, gazing out to sea.  After the briefest of smiles, I carried on my exploration.  As I turned to retrace my steps, she spoke to me.  “Did you see the dolphins?”

Crestfallen hardly describes it!  I would have loved to see them and wished she had spoken sooner.  We stood a while, hoping for a return, but they had gone.  And so I climbed, regretfully, back up the steps.

Depending on the tide, this walk can be as long or as short as you want to make it.  If you are free the next few Sunday lunch times, you will assuredly have company on the beach.  My husband, who designs gardens, does most of his work with CAD (computer aided design).  He was more than pleased to be contacted recently by Stuart Langley, a local artist, in connection with a light installation to appear at this year’s Lumiere, in Durham.  It’s an imaginative and exciting event, and Stuart has been a previous contributor with his Stained Glass Cars.  The project he is working on requires a substantial quantity of sea glass, and so he’s hoping for some help in gathering it.

If you can help in any way the Lumiere site gives details.  The event itself takes place from 12-15th November, and if you can be there I can promise you a delightful evening.  It takes place on alternate years, and this was my post for 2013.  It was a magical occasion.

walking logo

No putting the kettle on today!  I will still be in Bristol for the Hot Air Balloon festival when you’re reading this, and not back till very late in the day.  As usual, I will catch up with you all as soon as I can, and apologies to all those who are sitting unattended in my Inbox.  There’s plenty to keep you busy till then because once again I have some wonderful walks to share.  Many thanks to all of you who have joined me and, if you would like to do so next week, details are on my Jo’s Monday walk page.  Just hit the logo above.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Gardens with rhodies have always been irresistible to me.  Bogs, not so much!  Thanks, Anabel!

Geilston Garden and Tom na h’Airidh

Hitting the heights with Drake!  Don’t we always?

Mountain high

A revelation for me about Toronto! Totally changed my thinking…  thanks, Jackie!

Monday walk

More city madness with Pauline!  The inevitability of change :

Gold Coast Icons

If you’ve come to expect beauty from Amy, you won’t be disappointed here either!

Monday Walk : Banff Rocky Mountains

One of the best things about blogging is sharing magical posts such as this.  Many thanks, Suzanne!

Killarney x 2

Too good at speaking my mind, sometimes!  Hugs, please, for Jude :

The Levant Mine

A little bit of fairy dust, anybody?  Sure to find some with Violet Sky!

Wishes and dreams 

While anyone seeking inspiration should surely make a visit to Lucile :

The Quest for Inspiration

And anyone wanting to recapture childhood only needs to visit Gilly!

I Wish I was Ten Again

Debbie’s back from exotic Singapore with some cracking good sights!

Arty Stroll along Orchard Road

And to finish, from Laia, what could be better than?

A beautiful, pleasant walk in Abel Tasman National Park

Fantastic, aren’t they?  Nothing more to say than ‘have a great week’.  Hope to see you on the beach at Seaham, or failing that, at Durham in November.