Lagos

Jo’s Monday walk : A street art shuffle

Isn’t that just the most infectious smile? Reminds me of Mitzi Gaynor in “South Pacific”. Oops, showing my age! Truthfully, I didn’t intend walking with you this month. I know you’re all busy squaring like mad, and I’m busy…well…just living! It’s really too hot for a conventional walk, but your walks kept rolling in and I thought it was time to share a few.

Mondays are traditionally street art days, aren’t they? And it just so happens that I was in the Algarve capital of street art last weekend. Lagos played host again this summer to ARTURb, a project ‘with the concept of art on tour’, encouraging the free circulation of ideas and aesthetics in the art world. I had downloaded the map, and off I went, in extremely hot pursuit.

It was a very grey day by Algarve standards, and sticky with heat and humidity. Luckily I had a few distractions. Exiting through the archway to the castle, I found myself beside Forte da Ponta da Bandeira, always a good place to observe life. The sea was remarkably empty, several youngsters having thought to launch their boats at the yacht club, but then thought better of it. The waves were just a little too frisky!

Even on the cliff top there was little breeze, but I was on a mission. Braving the spray from the fountains in Praca Infante Dom Henrique, I headed back into town, where the streets are an intriguing mix of modernity and neglect. And almost guarantee a surprise around every corner.

Looking back you can see the scale of the original fortress walls, but little remains of this grandeur. Like many, the town was a victim of the 1755 earthquake. Some of these artworks have been in place for a number of years and bear the scars of age and disrespect.

Did you spot the pair of trainers dangling in the second from last? Potentialy useful? Political references abound and the eyes of the hurt and mistrustful hold your gaze. I did like the crinkly character below. A hint of mischief? Seen it all and still amused?

But it’s a town full of life and youthful exuberance, and I love that about it. A nautical town, it was a favoured residence of Henry the Navigator, and these days boasts a marina full of proud, expensive vessels. Another good spot to linger.

There are many aspects to Lagos. Next time I’ll take you to the cliff tops on a bright and beautiful day. Meanwhile I’m sharing with Sami’s Monday Mural and Marsha, lovely co-host of PPAC#5-Brilliant Art.

walking logo

And so, to the walks!

Demonstrating her ease with architecture and a camera, it’s always a delight to walk with Debbie :

A virtual high speed walk

A little more slowly, Sarah takes us to some very different dwellings :

In the footsteps of the Mogollon at Gila Cliff Dwellings

Aiva dazzles with rhododendrons and her daughter’s smile :

A Fantastic Walk for a Weekend: Benbulben Forest Walk in beautiful Sligo

Drake always seems to have such a positive, can-do outlook on life, and he goes to some beautiful places :

Colors in the streets

Countryside walk

Another side of countryside

Bigger than small

Traditionally, in its own way

Susan Joy has a super busy schedule!

Weekend Coffee Share – Cute Pets, Acai Bowl, Picnic in the Park

Janet is an early bird, who simply loves to share :

A Monday walk in the park

Surrounded by beauty, I. J. lures us to Arthur’s Seat :

An old favourite among walks

Liz would like to introduce herself, with promise of walks to come :

A Morning Walk at Manito Park in Spokane, Washington

And I find that I’m sharing thoughts, and the breath-taking beauty of her world, with my lovely friend, Ann-Christine :

Thursday Thoughts – A walk in my garden

Nice when an old friend pops up with a walk. Thanks, Albert!

Urambi Hills Summit Walk

Just when I think that all is quiet, Yvette drops by and takes me on a trip into the past :

Canal Walk in Richmond, VA (spring 2021)

Next thing you know, Mel has me plummeting down into a canyon!

Exploring the Great Outdoors – Knox Gorge, Karijini National Park, Western Australia

And then there are the things Helen loves!

Country Walks-Wooton Rivers, Pewsey Vale

Many thanks to everybody for sharing! I still anticipate the arrival of my son next Sunday and am keeping everything crossed for that. Hopefully I’ll be able to share another walk on Monday, 2nd August. Take good care till then!

Jo’s Monday walk : Loving Lagos

It’s not often that I venture to the western end of the Algarve but, when I do, the city of Lagos is a particular favourite of mine. I knew that my daughter loved it too, from a fleeting visit about 10 years ago.  What better excuse did I need for a bit of footloose and fancy free?

The old side of town is a warren of twisting and turning switchback streets, with fleeting glimpses of interest as you whizz around a harepin bend.  Lisa commented that she was glad not to be in the driving seat, but we put our faith in my valiant other half, and eventually we found parking, way up beyond the castle walls.  I had not realised that they were so extensive.  Following our noses led us to an interesting wall or two of graffiti.

Truth be known, these days some of Lagos is a little bit tacky with touristy shops and restaurants- a victim of its own success and having some of the Algarve’s most inviting beaches.  But I can overlook a street or two that resembles Albufeira because this is a very engaging place.  It has history and beautiful churches, and it has character in spades, if you go looking.

Peeping between the narrow streets, the spires of several churches catch the eye.  I knew Santo Antonio by reputation, but was a little disappointed not to be able to share the astounding architecture and elaborately gilded wood with you.  Photographs were forbidden, but I did manage to find a link.  On the main square, Santa Maria was much less elaborate, but still beautiful.

Lagos has a history stretching back over 2000 years.  Originally a Celtic settlement, it was colonised by the Romans (as Lacobriga), valuable to them for its fine harbour.  When the Moors arrived in the 8th century, they added fortifications of castle and walls, and established trading with North Africa.  Henry the Navigator made Lagos the centre of Portuguese maritime explorations in the 15th century, the caravels venturing further and further south along the west coast of Africa, hoping to find a route to India.  In 1434 Gil Eanes succeeded in rounding the cape but sadly, within 10 years, the slave trade was established.  Lagos has the dubious distinction of having Europe’s first slave market.  Prince Henry received one fifth of the selling price of each slave, helping him to fund further expeditions.

With the death of Henry, Lagos continued to receive shipments of goods and slaves but its role was gradually eclipsed by the rising star of Lisbon.  A string of forts was constructed along the coast to defend from pirates and neighbouring Spain.  Among them, Ponta da Bandeira Fort, which sits so picturesquely on the headland.  From 1576 to 1755, Lagos was capital of the Algarve, but the earthquake of 1755 destroyed much of the old town.  Some of the castle walls remain but many of the current buildings date from 17th century.

Knowing my tendency to linger by the sea, I was allowed only the merest glimpse of the fort before being whisked away to lunch.  The lure of white sangria just about did the trick.  Over lunch we discussed ‘where next’ and Lisa made it a mission to find for me the landmark ‘green building’ which appears in many images of Lagos.  We were, of course, permitted to dawdle by the odd shop.  Ingenious use is being made of cork these days- everything from tiny purses to sandals, with jewellery and even clever fans.  Eye catching balustrades and tumbles of flowers were duly noted.

Lisa was following Google maps (isn’t technology a wonderful thing?) in a haphazard sort of way.  There were simply too many distractions.  Crossing Praça Gil Eanes I could see just a snippet of Ribeira Bensafrim, the river that pours out into the ocean.  We climbed gently and found ourselves in a square looking at a very colourful building, which proved to be the living science centre. ( Centro Ciência Viva de Lagos)

A restaurant terrace looked out onto the marina and busy river.  No sign of the desired ‘green building’ but, as we retraced our steps downhill, there it was in all its glory.  How had we missed it?  ‘Azulejos e postais‘- Tiles and postcards, as it is now known, on Praça de Luis Camoes.

Close up the tiles were very beautiful, and the owner was delighted to discuss the restoration of his building.  Mission accomplished, it remained to find our way back uphill to where we left the car.  I hope you loved Lagos too, and enjoyed our ramble together.

I’m back in the UK now, so hopefully ‘normal’ service will resume, but I may be a while catching up.  Thanks so much for your loyalty, and for staying with me.  Once again I have a bumper bundle of walks to share, so do please find time to visit these lovely folk.  And if you’d like to share a walk with me, just follow the logo.  Many thanks!

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Everybody should see this place once in their lifetime, so thanks, Lady Lee :

Santorini

While nobody does spectacular better than Debbie :

Slow and exposed walk along the Thames

Drake treated me to the warm glow of Autumn in a place that I love :

Colorful Autumn

And Elaine took me to her pretty home patch, too :

Early November walk by the canal

While Jill took me to a place that I’ve long wanted to visit :

Come explore Cadiz with me

And Cadyluck Leedy took me to an area that I don’t know at all!

Jo’s Monday Walk : Dinan, France

Liesbet has some spectacular photos, taken between house sits :

Southern Utah’s National Parks

And Violet takes me waterfalling

Inglis Falls

I did think Silly Back Lane an odd place name, but then I looked again.  Cheers, Jude!

Siblyback Lake

But then Woolly made me sad all over again :

Jo’s-Monday-Walk-Wk43_Gibraltar-Bunker

There’s something so distinctive about French windows and shutters.  And about Tobias; style :

Beynac, Part One

Beynac, Part Two

I’m really enjoying  Carol’s ‘close to home’ series, with their wonderful details.  Just look at these trees!

BYO Birdseed

Becky’s cheating a little bit with this one :

Glass, iron and steel at Kew

But on Friday morning I was sitting right here, waiting for the ferry to the Ilha.  Sunny memories :

A short stroll at Quatro Aguas

I have a gazillion photos to sort, including those from Lumiere in Durham last night.  Amazing stuff!  It’s forecast a damp week so it looks like I’ll have time to spare.  Whatever you get up to, I hope it’s a good week for you.  Take care!

 

 

 

Sunday Post : Surroundings

Jakesprinter’s Surroundings look beautiful this week, as he lounges on the shore and waves to a passing boat.  Often enough I, too, sit with a beautiful vista before me.

Fountains playing in Lagos

Lagos fortress and old harbour

Taking to the sea, beneath Ponte da Piedade

And returning, surrounded by stacks

Boats on Tavira Island

And trees

And the setting sun

But today I’m feeling sad for all those people whose surroundings are miserable. People whose homes have been damaged by flood and fire, from Hurricane Sandy and all of nature’s extremes.  People who live in poverty.  People throughout the world who are confined by harsh leaders, or are victimised for their differences.  People who in this time of financial squeeze are struggling to maintain a grip on their surroundings.

And of course, on this, Remembrance Sunday, I’m feeling sad for those who risk their lives for us daily, often in grim surroundings.  My thoughts are with those whose surroundings are so much less desirable than my own.

Thanks, Jake, for this opportunity to share my good fortune.  Lest we forget.

Six word Saturday

Seeking new memories, in the Algarve

Castle walls, Lagos

Old harbour, Lagos

Mertola

Over the garden wall, Mertola

Another fountain candidate? Silves

Pego do Inferno

Cascades nearby Pego do Inferno

Grab a table at Mesa do Cume

Palace gardens, Estoi

Look, but don't touch! Vilamoura

Waterside at Cabanas

Easy to see why I keep going back, isn’t it?  I’ll be in the Algarve next week, making new memories to share, so I’ll miss the next Six week Saturday.  Why not join in with Cate?  Everybody’s got a story to share.  Follow the link to see what it’s all about.  You can click on the button below to see my previous posts, and I’ll look forward to seeing yours.